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Goddess Bambleshwari

Temple History

Bambleshwari Temple is on a hilltop of 1600 feet. This temple is referred as Badi Bambleshwari. Another temple at ground level, the Chhotti Bambleshwari is situated about 1/2 km from the main temple complex. These temples are revered by lakhs of people of Chhattisgarh who flock around the shrine during the Navratris of Kavar (during Dashera) and Chaitra (during Ram Navami). There is tradition of lighting Jyoti Kalash during Navaratris here.

Dongar means mountains while Garh means fort. Legend goes that around 2200 years ago, Raja Veersen, a local king, was childless and upon the suggestions of his royal priests performed puja to the gods. Within a year, the queen gave birth to a son whom they named Madansen. Raja Veersen considered this a blessing of Lord Shiva and Parvati and constructed a temple of Maa Bamleshwari. Raja Madansen had a son named Kamsen because of whom the area became famous and came to be known as Kamavati also called Kamakhaya Nagari.

Raja kamsen was a brave and courageous King who was fond of art and music. He had special blessings of Maa Bamleshwari. In his court there were lot of famous musicians and dancers, Kamkandla being the most beautiful dancer and Madhavanal the most talented musician. Once King Kamsen became very happy with Madhavanal's performance and gave him his necklace as a gift. Madhavanal gave the credit of his perfomance to Kamkandla and in turn put the gifted necklace in kamkandla's neck. The king felt insulted and punished Madhavanal by asking him to leave his kingdom. But Madhavanal and Kamkandla use to meet secretly as they liked each other.

Madhavanal moved to Ujjain and performed in King Vikramaditya's court. He was able to impress the king and when king asked what reward Madhavanal wants, Madhavanal wished for King's help in getting Kamkandla free from King kamsen's kingdom.

King Vikramaditya first tested the love of Madhavanal and Kamkandla and once he was satisfied, he decided to help Madhavanal. He sent a message to King Kamsen requesting him to free Kamkandla, but Kamsen refused. A war broke between King Vikramaditya and King Kamsen. Both were brave and had special blessings from their Lords, Vikramaditya had Mahakal's and Kamsen had Maa Vimla's blessings.Both the Kings prayed to their lords to help them and as a result Mahakal and Maa Vimla came to the battlefield. Looking to the consequences of war Lord Mahakal requested Maa Vimla to forgive king Vikramaditya and disappeared after uniting Madhavanal and kamkandla. It is this Maa Vimala who is residing as Maa Bamleshwari in Dongargarh. Another version states that there was complete destruction of KAMAVATI and Madhavanal also died which led Kamkandla to commit suicide. Vikramaditya felt guilty as he thought that he was responsible for Kaamkandala committing suicide. He underwent deep anguish and started constant worship, resulting in Maa Bagulamukhi Devi appearing before him.

Raja Vikramaditya requested the goddess to make both Maadhavnal and Kaamkandala alive and also asked Maa Bagulamukhi Devi to stay at the temple. Since then it is believed that Maa Baglamukhi Devi is present here. As time passed by the name got transformed from Maa Baglamukhi to Maa Bamlai to Shri Bamleshwari Mandir as it is known today.

 

Additional Information

The afternoon aarti at this temple has special significance. Maa Bamleshwari is an avatar of Maa Baglamukhi who is among the ten Mahavidya. It is said Lord Rama also worshiped Maa Baglamukhi and was blessed to defeat Ravana.

From Chhattisgarh Airport, Shri Bamleshwari Mandir is 130 Km, from Dongargarh station it is 1.7 Km. New Bus Stand Dongargarh is 2.2 Km from Shri Bamleshwari Mandir. Three wheeler autos are available from Station and bus stand.

One can opt to either take foot steps (1100 steps) or rope way to reach the temple
  • 4.00 AM to 12.00 PM, 1 PM to 10.30 PM (weekdays) 5.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m (sat-sun)
  • Contact Person: Manager (Shri Bamleshwari Mandir Trust Samiti)
  • Contact Number: +91-9329520145
http://bamleshwari.org